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Course Planning - Enrolled in 2016 and Earlier

 

Note: the following course outlines reflect students who entered the program as first-years in 2016/2017 or earlier. If you are joining the Faculty of Management as a first-year student in September 2017 or later, please visit the corresponding page.

 

  • First 2 Years

    Faculty of Management students in their first two years in the Bachelor of Management program take a broad selection of elective courses in arts and sciences. A minimum of 60 credits are earned and 21 credits of those are core courses.

    The compulsory courses prepare students for the intensive management studies that follow in Years 3 and 4.

    Course Planning First 2 Years - Diagram 1

    Year 1 & 2 Core Courses:

    Management 100
    Introduction to Canadian Business

    Management 200
    Personal and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Economics 101
    Principles of Microeconomics

    Psychology 111
    Introduction to Psychology - Basic Processes

    English 112 OR 114
    Studies in Composition,
    Studies in Composition: Aboriginal Perspectives OR
    6 credits of ENGL

    Math 100 OR 116*
    Differential Calculus with Applications to 
    Physical Sciences & Engineering OR
    Calculus I for Management & Economics*

    Statistics 121 OR 124*
    Elementary Statistics OR
    Business Statistics*

    * Preferred

    Click here to browse Management courses and descriptions.

    Year 1 & 2 Elective Courses:

    Students must take 39 credits of electives during their first two years. Any course offered for university credit may be taken.

    As you consider additional courses to complement your studies, consider the following list of recommended electives. You can choose to take any, none or all of the recommended elective courses:

    • ANTH 100 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
    • ECON 102 - Principles of Macroeconomics

    • ENGL 1XX - any additional first-year English course

    • MATH 142 - Calculus II for Management & Economics

    • PHIL 120 - Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking

    • PSYO 121 - Introduction to Psychology: Personal Functioning

    Please consult the University Calendar under Faculty of Management Degree Requirements for additional information.

    Academic requirements

    Student performance is assessed every year to ensure students are meeting academic requirements. Achieving a 60% or higher grade point average (GPA) in all compulsory courses will help with eligibility for Year 3; those who do not meet academic requirements may experience a mandatory reduction in course load or mandatory withdrawal from the program. For specific course requirements (e.g., ENGL grade requirements), visit Academic Regulations in the UBC Okanagan Academic Calendar.

    Student resources

  • Year 3

    Building on the background established in Years 1 and 2, Management’s third year consists of a fixed curriculum of Year 3 core courses. This standardized timetable is referred to as the cohort year. It is an intensive, fast-paced experience that focuses on developing the ability to work in teams, speak in public, complete projects, and develop time management skills. In Year 3, students complete 33 credits (instead of the standard 30), requiring continued commitment and development of effective work habits gained in the first two years of study.

    Year3

    Year 3 Core Courses

    Year 3 Management courses are scheduled as a fixed timetable of 11 courses conducted from September to April. When students register in a cohort they are automatically registered in all 11 standard timetable courses. All third-year courses must be taken within the Management program at UBC.

    Click here to browse Management courses and descriptions.

    Academic requirements

    Student performance is assessed every year to ensure students are meeting academic requirements. Achieving a 60% or higher grade point average (GPA) in all compulsory courses will help with eligibility for Year 3; those who do not meet academic requirements may experience a mandatory reduction in course load or mandatory withdrawal from the program. For details, visit Academic Regulations in the UBC Okanagan Academic Calendar.

    Student resources

    Year 4

    Students use their fourth year to deepen their understanding of management. Students enjoy a range of choices among upper-level courses in study areas of greatest interest, enabling focused preparation for a specific career path or further study. Students are free to choose any set of elective courses, so long as they meet the degree requirements.

    The program culminates in Management 490 Capstone, a hands-on learning opportunity that provides student teams with an opportunity to devise real-life solutions to problems facing a partner organization.

    Course Planning First 2 Years - Diagram 3

    Year 4 Core Courses

    Year 4 students complete their BMgt degree with up to nine courses (27 credits) of upper-level electives and the MGMT 490 Capstone (3 credits). If preferred, up to 9 credits of upper-level electives (such as 300- or 400-level ECON, PSYO or SOCI) may be substituted for 9 credits of upper-level MGMT electives.

    Year 4 Electives – exploring career options

    Wondering what courses you should take for a given career option? To help you choose electives that relate to various management areas and career choices, focus areas for study are provided below.

    NOTE: These options are only guidance, not requirements, to help with Year 4 elective course selection; these focus areas do not appear on your official UBC record. You are free to select any elective courses that meet the six courses (18 credits) of MGMT 400 level electives, and three courses (9 credits) of MGMT 400 or non-MGMT 300 or 400 level course.

    General Management

    The Faculty of Management offers, for guidance, the following general management option that is kept current and relevant through applied, experiential, and project-based courses. Careers for students who complete general management electives include entrepreneurial endeavours, general managers, project managers, small business owners, management consultants, health care administrators, strategy analysts and policy analysts. Students are free to choose courses across many areas to create a general management option for their fourth year.

    General Management course options (examples):
    • MGMT 410 - Leadership in Complex Environments
    • MGMT 412 - Negotiations
    • MGMT 422 - Project Management
    • MGMT 424 - Enterprise Systems Management
    • MGMT 450 - Entrepreneurship and the Smaller Firm
    • MGMT 480 - Law and Business
    • MGMT 481 - Strategy and Change Management
    • MGMT 482 - International Business

    Resource for students interested in General Management: International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA)

    Accounting

    Accountants engage in a wide variety of activities besides preparing financial statements and recording business transactions. Such activities include auditing, analysis of costs and efficiency gains from new technologies, participating in strategies for mergers and acquisitions, quality management, developing and using information systems to track financial performance, tax strategy, business process improvement, and health-care benefits management. The designation in Canada is CPA.

    Professional accountants must be good with numbers, however clients and employers often think of them as problem solvers. Success as a professional accountant requires excellent written and oral communication skills, the ability to quickly identify a problem and its underlying causes, competence in critical and creative thought, and outstanding technical knowledge.

    Accounting course options:
    • MGMT 400 - Intermediate Financial Accounting (6 credit course)
    • MGMT 401 - Intermediate Managerial Accounting
    • MGMT 402 - Introduction to Income Taxes in Canada
    • MGMT 403 - Auditing and Assurance Services
    • MGMT 404 - Advanced Financial Accounting
    • MGMT 405 - Advanced Managerial Accounting
    • MGMT 437 - Intermediate Finance (previously MGMT 439E)
    • MGMT 480 - Law and Business
    Resource for students interested in professional accounting:

    Chartered Professional Accountants (CPA) *The Faculty of Management fourth-year accounting courses listed above is a selection of courses required as transfer credit into the CPA Professional Education Program (CPA PEP). Click here to review CPA academic prerequisites.

    Entrepreneurial Technology

    Creating entrepreneurial technology start-ups is a large and growing portion of the Canadian economy, estimated to be the major economic force in the world's economy; yet Canada fell 10 points in Global Competitiveness rankings from third in 2001 to thirteenth in 2007. Aiming to enable our graduates to contribute to a reversal of this trend, Entrepreneurial Technology education in Management focuses on building technology-based business models, e-business, open services, social media products and corporate projects orientated towards entrepreneurial technology.

    Students build desirable skills that can lead to jobs: creating new revenue generating business models for the social-media world, leading technology projects in companies, creating companies, and championing entrepreneurial projects within corporate offices. People enter technology careers in different ways. Entry-level positions are available to students with undergraduate business degrees and project management experience. People skills, analytical ability, logical thinking, and creativity are key competencies for moving up in organizations.

    Entrepreneurial Technology course options:
    • MGMT 412 - Negotiations
    • MGMT 422 - Project Management
    • MGMT 421 - Outsourcing, Offshoring and Globalization
    • MGMT 423 - E-Commerce
    • MGMT 424 - Enterprise Systems Management
    • MGMT 425 - Strategies in Entrepreneurial Technology (previously MGMT 429C)
    • MGMT 429D - Special Topics in Information Technology Management - Food Systems Management
    • MGMT 443 - New Product & Services Development
    • MGMT 450 - Entrepreneurship and the Smaller Firm

    Resource for students interested in entrepreneurial technology: Information Technology Association of Canada (ITAC)

    Finance

    The finance sector encompasses a broad range of organizations that deal with the management of financial assets. There are many career paths within the finance sector including the finance department in any business enterprise, the financial service industry, and departments of government. The financial services industry includes firms that are engaged in activities such as investing, lending, insurance, securities trading and securities issuance. This is not an exhaustive list, but these companies can be characterized as being in one or more of the following lines of business: banking, insurance, securities brokerage, investment banking, securities trading, investment management and securities analysis. Some finance designations include: CFA, FCSI, PFP, CIM, and MTI.

    Finance course options:
    • MGMT 419N - Special Topics in Management - Financial Statement Analysis 
    • MGMT 424 - Enterprise Systems Management
    • MGMT 435 - Risk Management 
    • MGMT 436 - Investments
    • MGMT 437 - Intermediate Finance (previously MGMT 439E)
    • MGMT 438 - Capital Asset Budgeting (previously MGMT 439B)

       

    Resource for students interested in Finance: Certified Financial Analyst (CFA)

    Human Resources

    Human Resources (HR) helps establish and maintain the relationship between the employer and employee. HR manages recruitment, benefit and compensation packages, training, personnel retention programs, union/management issues and the strategic use of an organization’s human capital. People who work in HR need to understand trends that affect workplace conditions, as well as legal issues pertaining to age, race, and disability discrimination, health-and-safety requirements, and confidentiality. Most areas of HR require excellent interpersonal and communications skills, and a high degree of resourcefulness. Graduates have the opportunity to pursue the CHRP designation (Certified Human Resources Professional).

    There are two main branches of HR:

    1. Human Resources Management is concerned with the recruitment, training and compensation of workers within an organization. The major areas of HRM include: recruiting and staffing; compensation and benefits; labour and employee relations; and health and safety.
    2. Human Resources Development is concerned with the activities in an organization that help maintain skilled employees. HRD includes: training and learning; organization development (succession planning and coaching); and performance management.
    Human Resources course options:
    • MGMT 411 - Human Resources Management
    • MGMT 412 - Negotiations
    • MGMT 422 - Project Management
    • MGMT 424 - Enterprise Systems Management
    • MGMT 480 - Law and Business
    • MGMT 482 - International Business

    Resource for students interested in Human Resources: Chartered Professionals in Human Resources Canada

    Marketing

    All organizations must have a strategy and a process for the marketing of their products, services and offerings. Marketing, along with sales, production, and finance is one of the core functional areas in most companies. Many organizations, including some of the largest in the world, rely on marketing strategy to drive company profits.

    People enter marketing careers in different ways. Entry-level positions are available to individuals with business or liberal arts undergraduate degrees, or to those who have had sales experience. Analytical ability, people skills and creativity are key competencies for entry-level positions.

    Marketing course options:
    • MGMT 422 - Project Management
    • MGMT 424 - Enterprise Systems Management
    • MGMT 423 - E-Commerce
    • MGMT 440 - Brands, Culture, and Marketing
    • MGMT 441 - Marketing Strategy
    • MGMT 442 - Consumer Behaviour
    • MGMT 443 - New Product and Service Development

    Resources for students interested in Marketing:

    Operations and Supply Chain Management

    Supply chain management (SCM) is involved in every aspect of getting products to the customers, from raw materials to consumption. SCM is essential to remain competitive in industries such as manufacturing, retailing, logistics and distribution. The significance of upstream suppliers’ roles increases with the complexity of the product. Supply chain practitioners need to find suppliers, negotiate with them to make the desired components at a competitive price, and coordinate with suppliers to ensure the availability of components for the assembly lines, as needed.

    Supply chain managers are responsible for warehouse and inventory management and distribution and transporting of the products to local and regional distribution centres. Also, supply chain managers are required to take action when a supplier sends parts late or sends parts that do not satisfy requirements.

    Operations and Supply Chain Management course options:
    • MGMT 412 - Negotiations
    • MGMT 419O - Special Topics in Management-Service Operations and Supply Chain Concepts
    • MGMT 421 - Outsourcing, Offshoring, and Globalization
    • MGMT 422 - Project Management
    • MGMT 423 - E-Commerce
    • MGMT 424 - Enterprise Systems Management

    Resource for students interested in Operations and Supply Chain: Supply Chain Management Association (SCMA)

    Click here to browse Management courses and descriptions.

    Student resources

    Minor

    While completing the Bachelor of Management degree, students have the ability to supplement their degree with a minor. There are 3 disciplines in which students can choose to minor:

    Minor in Economics

    To complete a minor in Economics, students must accumulate no fewer than 30 credits in Economics. At least 18 of their credits must be numbered 300 or above. This may require students to take additional credits of study.

    Minor in Psychology

    To complete a minor in Psychology, students must accumulate no fewer than 30 credits in Psychology. At least 18 of their credits must be numbered 300 or above. This may require students to take additional credits of study.

    Minor in Sociology

    To complete a minor in Sociology, students must accumulate no fewer than 30 credits in Sociology as specified below. This may require students to take additional credits of study.

    • SOCO 111 & SOCO 121
    • At least 6 credits of 200 level Sociology (excluding SOCI 202 & SOCI 203)
    • 18 credits of 300 or 400 level Sociology.
    Planning for Your Minor

    In order to complete a minor in any of the 3 disciplines, students must acquire a total of 30 credits from that discipline before graduation. Minors are declared via the Student Service Center (SSC) in Year 3.

    In order to successfully complete a minor within 4 years, it is highly recommended that students dedicate elective credits toward minor credits as early as Year 1. Because of the 2+2 structure, the Faculty of Management suggests that before Year 3, students aim to complete at least 21 credits of the 30 credits that are required for a minor. The remaining 9 credits will double as the 9 upper-level credits that you are required to complete in Year 4.

    Course Planning for your Minor

    This diagram is for example purposes only – your course schedule will vary due to which minor you choose and which courses you choose. Because you are required to take at least 18, 300-level or above courses, be careful to complete the necessary pre-requisite (100 and 200 level) courses as early as possible to keep your minor on track.

    In the 4th year, students must complete 9 elective credits that are 400 level Management courses, 400/300 level NON-Management courses, or a combination of both. Students who are completing a minor will often reserve these 9 elective credits for the remaining upper-level credits needed for a minor. Because students are only allowed 9 elective credits in their final year of study, it is important for students who wish to graduate on time that they enter Year 4 having completed at least 21 of the 30 credits needed for a minor.

    Student resources

    Transfer

    The delivery of the Bachelor of Management is changing effective 2017. The Faculty of Management recommends prospective students looking to transfer to UBC for this program consult with the Undergraduate Program Coordinator prior to applying to the Okanagan Campus, so they can ensure applicants are aware of the applicable program requirements and credit transferability.

    Last reviewed shim10/13/2017 4:27:07 PM